Best Practices For Safely Felling a Tree

In this article, you’ll learn why homeowners should always leave tree removal to the pros!!

A mature tree can be dozens of feet tall and weigh many tons. When a tree of any size needs to be felled, real danger will always be present. 

Even the tools used to fell trees require careful handling and special precautions if they are to be used safely. Threats like power lines make many tree felling projects even more hazardous, sometimes without even being identified beforehand. 

Trees should only ever be cut down and removed by trained, certified specialists who know how to do so safely. Familiarity with the acknowledged issues and best practices, though, will help a homeowner understand what must be done to fell a tree safely and why it is so important to call a professional. 

Many Dangers to Account for When Planning to Fell Any Tree 

People with no experience sometimes assume that felling a dead, diseased, or simply unwanted tree should be easy. The numbers say otherwise, with the Bureau of Labor Statistics recording many related injuries and even fatalities nationwide every year. 

What makes felling any tree so dangerous is simply that there are always multiple, significant threats that have to be accounted for. That requires understanding and sticking to best practices concerning issues including:

  • Safety gear. At a minimum, everyone involved with the felling of a tree will need to own and wear protective headgear, safety goggles, and thick, tough gloves. Most professionals today also use other safety-enhancing items like cut-resistant Kevlar pants. 
  • Tools. Chainsaws, chippers, and other tools used for tree removal are inherently dangerous. Operators need to be trained not just in the operation of such devices, but also how to use them safely in dynamic, unpredictable environments. 
  • Deadwood. Even a limb or section of trunk that outwardly appears healthy can be rotten within. Certified tree care professionals assume that deadwood is present until they have specifically proven otherwise. 
  • Falling. It will normally take a fair amount of pruning before a tree can be felled safely. While trimming can sometimes be conducted from the ground, technicians will often need to climb a tree to handle the work, exposing themselves to the danger of falling. Adhering to OSHA-promulgated guidelines at all times is the only way to stay safe in such situations. 
  • Environmental hazards. Even a power line that looks safely out of reach can end up causing serious injuries or worse when a tree is being felled. Careful analysis of the surroundings and making appropriate related arrangements is the key to neutralizing environmental threats when felling a tree. 
  • Impacts. When a tree finally gets cut down, it must only ever be after careful preparation. That includes properly notching the trunk and taking other precautions to ensure the tree can only fall in the desired direction. The area where the tree will land also needs to be cleared completely and kept that way, with additional space being freed up for branches and other debris. 

Always Call a Licensed Professional When Any Tree Needs to be Felled 

Of all the projects that can take place on a residential property, felling a tree easily ranks among the most dangerous. Certified professionals have to account for issues like those above and others to safely cut down and remove trees for their clients. 

Because of this, homeowners should always have such licensed specialists handle the work whenever a tree needs to be removed. That is the only way to be sure that the job will be completed safely. For a free estimate, give us a call at 720-999-9294 for your tree care and removal needs. We look forward to working with you!

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